Homemade Wheat Sandwich Bread: A Complete Guide


A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfoodI’ve always been afraid of the fickle beast. That’s what my friend, Carla, and I call yeast. Good homemade bread without a bread maker has eluded me for years, because I could never get the yeast or recipe or something just right. That all changed recently.

One of my best friends and mentor, “Aunt” Jeannette, spent the afternoon with me and my 4-year-old daughter last week teaching us the art of making homemade bread. As I made this same recipe again with my daughter this past weekend, I reflected on the soulfulness–the great history of humanity even–that is felt when you make bread and pass it on to another generation. Perhaps one day I’ll be able to pass along this little artifact from our home to my daughter’s children.

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfoodNow, besides the beauty of the process, homemade wheat sandwich bread is the best sandwich bread I’ve ever tasted. I’m not exaggerating. Not only is it all recognizable ingredients (aka real food!), but your family will gobble it up and it’s cheap. Read on to see how much I’m saving by making my own now.

I picked Jeannette’s brain, tested this recipe many, many times, and did research to create this complete guide to making homemade wheat sandwich bread. Expect that I’ll be experimenting with a 100% whole wheat bread and the use of honey as a sweetener soon! 🙂 I really encourage you to give this recipe a try and let me know how it goes!

So, why should I take time to make my own homemade sandwich bread?

  • It’s MUCH tastier than bread you can buy at the store.
  • It’s cheaper than the store. (see my savings below)
  • You control what goes in. No preservatives or yucky cheap ingredients like HFCS or words you can’t pronounce.
  • Did I mention it tastes good? This bread makes your home feel and smell like home.

Here are just two of our favorite ways to use this sandwich bread…

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood

What equipment do I need for homemade bread?

  • A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfoodKitchen Aid mixer with dough hook and bowl
  • cooking thermometer (a digital one is helpful)
  • a large mixing bowl
  • a whisk
  • wooden mixing spoon
  • glass liquid measuring cup
  • a set of measuring cups
  • a set of measuring spoons
  • a clean dishtowel
  • rolling pin
  • 3 small loaf pans (These are the ones we used and highly recommend! The smaller size makes for a shape that is much like sandwich bread and produced a beautiful golden top.)

What ingredients do I need for homemade wheat sandwich bread?

  • A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfoodwhole wheat flour (I highly recommend white whole wheat flour, because it’s much lighter.)
  • unbleached all-purpose flour
  • vital wheat gluten
  • salt (I like Real Salt.)
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • sucanat or brown sugar
  • yeast (I used this quick-rising yeast.)
  • warm water (between 110-115 degrees)
  • cooking spray
  • stick of butter (optional)

How much does homemade sandwich bread cost?

I’ve been buying some delicious bakery bread for years that is over $4 a loaf with tax. I know…ridiculously expensive. But, it’s really, really good and not full of preservatives. In fact, most of the homemade loaves at our farmer’s market are $6 and up. Here’s my rough estimate of what it cost me with the ingredients I used. I’m sure you could use cheaper ingredients than I did, though. Check out how much money I’m saving per loaf now!

flour: $1.50
brown sugar: .10
salt: .5
flaxseed: .75
vital wheat gluten: .50
yeast: 1.00

Total for 3 loaves = $3.90

TOTAL COST PER LOAF OF BREAD = $1.30

So, if I make my own bread, I’m saving $3.00 per loaf of bread. We go through three loaves a week, so that’s $36/month saved!

How long does it take to make 3 loaves?

Here’s the time break-down:

  • 30 minutes to put the ingredients together and knead in the mixer
  • about 1 hour for the first rise
  • about 30-40 minutes for the second rise
  • about 25 minutes to bake

TOTAL TIME = 2 1/2 – 3 hours (only about 40 minutes of that is active work on your part)

So, if you spend one morning a week (in between doing other chores around the house), you can have homemade wheat sandwich bread for the entire week!

What else do I need to know before starting?

  • Read through the entire recipe and lay out all equipment and ingredients.
  • The most precise part of this recipe is getting the water the right temperature so you don’t kill the yeast or not activate it. That’s why you need a thermometer.
  • Keep moving quickly at the beginning of the recipe to stay on track with the timing. You’ll have time to clean up and work on other things during the two rise cycles and while it’s baking.
  • Take a cold stick of butter after it’s done, and run it over the top as soon as it comes out. Makes a pretty glaze and adds flavor!
  • Storage Tips: Tightly wrap cooled bread in plastic wrap and store on the counter or in pantry. It may last longer in the fridge, but it will get drier faster. If you aren’t going to use it within 2-3 days, tightly wrap in a few layers of plastic wrap and then with foil on the outside. Place in the freezer, where it will stay good for up to 3 months.
  • After two days, the bread will begin to get drier, but you can still use it for toast or Blueberry Baked French Toast, Sweet Potato French Toast, Pumpkin French Toast. Or make it into bread crumbs for Chicken Piccata, Fish Sticks, or Chicken Parmesan.
  • Other than the temp of the water, bread-making is more of an art than a science. Experiment with the amount of flour. Keep in mind that weather and temperatures within your home will affect it, as well. It just takes practice…and I know I still have a lot to go! But, it’s so fun.

I’m sold. How do I make it?

Here’s a tutorial of how to make Homemade Wheat Sandwich Bread, complete with pictures. The full recipe is at the bottom.

Ingredients:
3 cups warm water (110-115 degrees)
1 ½ tablespoons yeast
¼ cup sucanat or packed brown sugar
3 ½ cups unbleached white flour, plus ½-1 cup more as needed (if dough is too sticky and for dusting the counter)
3 ½ cups white whole wheat flour
¼ cup ground flaxseed
1 tablespoons salt
3 tablespoons vital wheat gluten, optional
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
a cold stick of butter, optional

Step-by-Step Directions:

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood

1) In your kitchen aid mixer bowl, add warm water (make sure it’s between 110-115 degrees), yeast, and sugar. Stir until combined and let stand 10 minutes. Should become foamy on top, like mine above, if the yeast is activated. If not, sorry, start over.

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood

2) Meanwhile, in large mixing bowl, whisk together flours, flaxseed, salt, and vital wheat gluten (optional).

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood3) Then, add olive oil into the yeast/water mixture. Don’t stir. Then stir in the flour mixture until combined. Using the bread hook, mix dough on a low setting in Kitchen Aid Mixer for about 10 minutes.

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood4) Stop and take it off the hook every few minutes to assure it’s mixing well. (I do this about 3-4 times.) You can also add more small amounts of flour in increments if the dough is too sticky while it is mixing.

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood5) Place dough ball in large greased bowl. Turn it around in the bowl to get it greased all around.

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood6) Then cover the bowl with a smooth dishtowel.

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood7) Set bowl in a warm place and let it rise until doubled in size, about an hour. I’ve found that letting it rise in a warm oven works best for me. I preheat it to the lowest temperature (170 degrees) and then turn it off before putting the dough in to rise.

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood8) After the dough has doubled, punch down the dough in the bowl. (This is fun!)

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood9) Then, divide the dough evenly into three equal parts on a lightly floured surface. A food scale makes it easier to divide the dough exactly. I just eyeball it myself.

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood10) Roll out each portion of dough with a rolling pin to remove air bubbles.

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood11) Then, roll up each one into a loaf size and put into pan seam-side down. Sometimes I have to squish and reshape the dough roll a little to make it fit into the loaf pans the right way. Spray tops of loaves with baking spray.

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood12) Cover with the light towel again and let rise again only until it’s doubled, about 30-40 minutes. Again, I do this in a slightly warm oven (about 170 degrees). Note: Do not let it over rise or the bread will deflate when it bakes!

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood

13) Bake loaves on the middle rack at 350 degrees for about 25 minutes or until top is golden brown. (Important Cooking Note: If you preheat the oven first, the loaves take about 25 minutes to bake. But, if you let your bread rise in a 170 degree oven like I do, then simply leave the bread in there, remove the towel that’s on top, and turn the temp to 350 degrees. This method takes about 30 minutes. To test for doneness, look for golden brown tops and tap the tops. If the loaves sound hollow, then they baked through.)

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood14) Let loaves completely cool in the pan on a wire rack.

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood15) Optional: Take a cold stick of butter while they are still warm, and run it over the top as soon as they come out. (Do this! It looks so pretty and tastes so good.)

A step-by-step tutorial to make the tastiest homemade wheat bread you've ever had! It's simpler than you think. #realfood16) Once the bread is cool, slice on a cutting board and serve! Tip: Using a bread knife, saw back and forth and don’t press down on bread.

Here’s a nice little printable version for you. May your home be filled with warmth and soulfulness as you make this homemade wheat sandwich bread!

5.0 from 1 reviews
Homemade Wheat Sandwich Bread
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Homemade wheat sandwich bread is the best sandwich bread I've ever tasted. I'm not exaggerating. Not only is it all recognizable ingredients (aka real food!), but your family will gobble it up and it's cheap.
Author:
Serves: Makes: 3 loaves
Ingredients
  • 3 cups warm water (110-115 degrees)
  • 1 ½ tablespoons yeast
  • ¼ cup sucanat or packed brown sugar
  • 3 ½ cups unbleached white flour, plus ½-1 cup more as needed (if dough is too sticky and for dusting the counter)
  • 3 ½ cups white whole wheat flour
  • ¼ cup ground flaxseed
  • 1 tablespoons salt
  • 3 tablespoons vital wheat gluten, optional
  • ⅓ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • a cold stick of butter, optional
Instructions
  1. In your kitchen aid mixer bowl, add warm water, yeast, and sugar. Stir until combined and let stand 10 minutes. Should become foamy on top, if the yeast was activated.
  2. Meanwhile, in large mixing bowl, whisk together flours, flaxseed, salt, and vital wheat gluten (optional).
  3. Add olive oil into the yeast/water mixture. Don't stir.
  4. Using the bread hook, add flour mixture slowly (about 1 cup full at time) on a low setting in Kitchen Aid Mixer and then let it knead for about 10 minutes. Add a little more flour if it's too sticky. Stop and take it off the hook every few minutes to assure it's mixing well. (I do this about 3-4 times.)
  5. Place in large greased bowl. Turn dough ball around in the bowl to get it greased all around. Then cover the bowl with a smooth dishtowel. Set bowl in a warm place and let it rise until doubled in size, about an hour.
  6. Punch down the dough in the bowl. Then, divide evenly into three equal parts on a lightly floured surface.
  7. Roll out each portion of dough with rolling pin to remove air bubbles. Then, roll up each one into a loaf size and put into a greased pan seam-side down. Spray tops of loaves with baking spray.
  8. Cover and let rise again only until it's doubled, about 30-45 minutes. Note: Do not let it over rise or the bread will deflate when it bakes!
  9. Bake loaves on the middle rack at 350 degrees for 25-30 minutes or until top is golden brown. (Important Cooking Note: If you preheat the oven first, it takes about 25 minutes to bake. But, if you let your bread rise in a 170 degree oven like I do, then simply leave the bread in and turn the temp to 350 degrees. This method takes about 30 minutes. To test for doneness, look for golden brown tops and tap the tops. If the loaves sound hollow, then they baked through.)
  10. Let loaves completely cool in the pan on a wire rack. Optional: Take a cold stick of butter after it's done, and run it over the top as soon as it comes out.
  11. Then gently turn the loaves out and slice on a cutting board. Tip: Using a bread knife, saw back and forth and don't press down on bread.

 

ht: Thanks to Tanya P. for her original sandwich bread recipe!




Comments

  1. Kathy says

    I don’t have a Kitchen Aide mixer, so I have cut the recipe in half and am using the dough cycle of my bread machine. I don’t see any reason why this won’t turn out. So far, very easy and I expect to have a lovely large loaf by this afternoon.

    • Kathy says

      Okay, finished but not as pretty as yours. I guess you need to use the Kitchen Aide mixer to get the best results. Tastes good, however!

      • Rachel says

        Nice attempt! Sorry it wasn’t as pretty.

  2. Tanya Parmele says

    Note for Kathy,
    I used to make my great grandmothers bread recipe back in high school and long before I ever owned a kitchen aid mixer. Back then I started it all with a good old hand mixer. As the dough got to think, I’d begin stirring it by hand. Obviously it takes a bit more effort, but you can achieve similar results.

    It’s a great post Rachel! I’ll admit that I’ve never given much thought to the beauty and history that goes into a loaf of bread.

  3. Gretchen says

    Rachel, Can you give the measurements of the small loaf pans? Thanks! And sorry if you mentioned it in the post and I missed it. Gretchen

  4. Kirsten says

    Have you tried this with just whole wheat flour? Hubby and I can’t have white flour at all. Whole wheat, spelt, coconut, etc. flours are fine, just not white. Would I need to add more liquids? Thanks so much for that information. This looks delicious and I can’t wait to try it. I may just have to experiment with it and let you know.

    • Rachel says

      Kirsten, I have not tried it with 100% whole wheat yet, but I’d like to eventually. I know it will change some of the ratios, so if you attempt it you may need to add less flour. I’d love to hear how it goes. Thanks for stopping by! – Rachel

  5. Sarah says

    I tried this today because I’m always searching for a good, easy homemade bread recipe. I followed the directions, but ended up with three bread logs rather than loafs. Any suggestions? My yeast foamed nicely, I put the dough in my oven with the light on to rise and I thought I had a decent first rise, though it didn’t really punch down like I expected it to, so maybe it really didn’t rise enough? I let it rise for about 15 minutes over the recommended hour. Then, when I rolled it into logs and let it rise again, I gave it 30 minutes and started the oven but the risen dough didn’t even fill up the pans and I used the size you recommended. I can’t tell you how frustrated I am. I seem to never be able to make a load of bread that turns out anything like it should. Please tell me what I’m doing wrong… Does it need to rise for hours and hours?

    • Rachel says

      Oh my goodness, I am SO sorry. I know exactly how you feel, because this is what has happened to me in the past and why I’ve shirked away from using yeast recipes. It’s so hard to diagnose what went wrong without being there to be honest. If your yeast foamed, you at least know it was active. Do you think you measured everything else correctly? Is it possible your oven was too hot when it was rising and killed the yeast then? It should take close to the times I put in the post. I’ve made this many times and it’s risen really well all of them. When you punch it down, it will literally deflate. I wish you could come over and I could show you in person. Maybe give it a go again and just leave it on the counter to rise this time once you’re over this initial disappointment? Any other readers have any advice?

      • Sarah says

        I will try the counter in the future. Usually my kitchen is too cold to get any rising action, but I could try the counter for a while and always stick it in the oven with the light on if it doesn’t do anything. Also, I think I need to try adding the wheat gluten. I didn’t have any and hoped I could get away without it but maybe my flour is just too dense. Thanks for your reply 🙂

        • Carla says

          Hi Sarah. I have trouble with yeast recipes too and almost didn’t try this one. I’ve only made it once and I put 3 times the amount of brown sugar in it. I didn’t realize until later in the process.

          Anyway, my first rise was like Rachel’s, where it was over the bowl and deflated when I punched it down. The second rise took much, much longer. I think it was due to having too much sugar from what I read. My bread turned out edible… I made french toast from much of it.

          But, I am saying all this for a couple reasons. Even though most people will have the same rise times as Rachel, we all have different temperatures in our kitchens, use different kinds of flour, etc. I’m definitely not an expert. I just want to encourage you to try again… add the wheat gluten. (I don’t know if it makes a difference, but this was the first time I used it and by all accounts, it should’ve been another fail). Perhaps focus on what your rises look like instead of how long they take. Even if they take twice as long or more than Rachel’s, having homemade bread would be so worth it! Just start the process early in the day! 🙂

    • Ashleigh M. says

      This could very easily be because you either did not activate the yeast properly or you killed the yeast. The temperature of the liquid you dissolve yeast in is crucial, as well as the time length the yeast is allowed to dissolve.

  6. Charisse says

    I made this bread last week and it was delicious. I got a good rise out of it compared to some of the other breads that I make, but it didn’t rise quite as nicely as yours, but I had my kitchen window open and had a but of a draft in my kitchen which I think affected it. I make bread every weekend so I am not too discouraged by this. I am making it again right now but have substituted in a bit of oat flour for the white flour since I don’t care much for that. Fingers are crossed that it comes out a little taller this week.

    • Rachel says

      Thanks for the feedback, Charisse. Did the oat flour work out? Did it rise better this time?

  7. Cheryl says

    Hi Rachel love the look of your bread its so nice here all the wonderful Coments!!! I was just wondering would the yeast have to be the Traditional yeast or the quick yeast I am new at making bread thank you!!!

    • Rachel says

      Hi Cheryl. Great question. I asked my friend, Jeannette, and she said she’s used both. I have only used Red Star Quick Rise Yeast every time. So, perhaps that is why my rise time was shorter than what others mentioned in the comments?? I hope that helps. Godspeed in your bread making. It takes a little practice, but it so gratifying when you open the oven that first time and see that it worked!

  8. jana says

    Check your altitude!! The higher you live, the longer it takes to rise. Also your bread cooks hotter, if that is the case lower your oven temp. Hope this helps!

  9. Melanie says

    For those of you who think you need a Kitchen Aid mixer to make this bread, I can tell you with certainty that you do not. I NEVER use a mixer for bread. I have recently started whipping it a little bit with a whisk and then switch to a wooden spoon when it gets too thick for the whisk, but I never use an electric mixer of any sort. I also don’t worry about foaming action of my yeast and I use the inside of my arm to determine if the water is the right temperature – not so hot you can’t hold it under the faucet, but only a little cooler than that. It’s the kneading of the bread that is going to play the biggest role in the outcome of the final loaf. Knead it until you think it’s good enough and then knead it some more. I’ve been making homemade bread for years and it’s more of a “feel” thing than an exact science. You don’t even need to measure your ingredients particularly well.

  10. Aaron says

    Used your recipe to make 3 sandwich loaves today. They turned out perfect! Moist & springy! Definitely making this my go to wheat bread recipe! (Used KA Mixer**)

    • Rachel says

      Thanks for sharing your experience. I’m so delighted to hear that it worked perfectly for you! I tried making it by hand kneading for about 10 minutes last week, and it was still tasty, but denser. I should have kneaded a lot longer I guess. The Kitchen Aid mixer helps a lot.

  11. Wow. This bread is beautiful! Question, is the yeast the instant fast-acting yeast or regular yeast? Thanks for sharing such a lovely recipe 🙂

    • Rachel says

      I used quick-rising yeast, but my friend who makes this all the time said she has used both kinds. Thanks for stopping by!

  12. Rachel says

    Hello there! I’d love to make this bread but can’t add the flax seed. Is that a necessary component?

    • Rachel says

      It will be just fine without the flax.

  13. Bethany says

    Thank you so much for this recipe! I have never made bread before and have always wanted to try it, but thought if I didn’t have a bread machine it would be too hard. I followed your recipe exactly and compared my results to your pictures and my bread turned out amazing! My husband told me I better never buy him bread from the store again! I have two loaves in the freezer still so I’m anxious to see how they defrost and turn out.

    • Rachel says

      I thrilled it turned out so well for you Bethany! Thanks for leaving feedback.

  14. Alaina says

    OMG! I can’t tell how exciting it is to see someone else with the exact same, old-school, avocado green KitchenAid mixer that I have! I actually was looking for an every-day bread recipe and found this lovely one on your blog, and then started scrolling through the post and saw your mixer! My mom (lovingly) passed on her fantastic old mixer to me when she redid her kitchen 7 or 8 years ago. It was a wedding present to her in 1971 and is still alive and kicking. Glad to see it has a buddy out there in the world! It’s serendipitous – I must try this recipe this very evening. Thanks!

    • Rachel says

      Three cheers for the avocado green mixers of the world…all three of them. 😉

  15. Candy says

    Love your recipe! The pictures and explanations are very helpful for folks like me who are visual learners. I was wondering if you’d ever used honey instead of or in place of some of the sugar? If not, any thoughts on what I might expect? Thanks!

    • Rachel says

      I have not used honey is this specific recipe, but my guess it that it won’t alter the taste or texture much. Give it a try! I’d love to know if it works out ok since that would be a better source of sugar.

    • Kristal says

      I used honey today. I never measure anything, so I don’t know how much I put in, but it turned out great. I don’t know that I’ve ever made a homemade bread that was so squishy and soft.

  16. Sue says

    What does the gluten do for the bread. Is it necessary?

  17. Charlotte Moore says

    I am curious to know if this is 2 different bread baking times? The pans are different in the first picture than the rest of the pictures. The bread really looks good. I make 100% whole wheat. I use hard white Montana Wheat that I grind myself. I just don’t consider it whole wheat if it isn’t 100% whole wheat. I know lots of recipes say that it is.

    • Rachel says

      These pics are from two different times I baked the bread. You’re right! How did it turn out with 100% whole wheat? The times I’ve done that so far it has been too dense for my taste, although I love knowing it’s 100% whole grain.

  18. Leah says

    I love this recipe, I’ve made it several times with success. I do have two questions have you attempted a honey wheat using this recipe? I was also curious if I needed to adjust the vital wheat gluten when adding a gluten free flour, such as amarunth flour? Thanks!

    • Rachel says

      I haven’t tried to make it with honey yet but I’d like to. And, I’m sorry that I don’t know much about GF flour and the adjustments you need to make there. Sorry I can’t be of more help!

  19. Kristina says

    I don’t have.a.Kitchen Aid mixer or bread maker. What can I use to mix? What.did they use.in the.old days? lol

    • Rachel says

      Ha, ha! My friend, Tanya, who developed the recipe said she stirs the ingredients together and then turns it out on a well-floured surface and then kneads it by hand. This takes more time than the mixer, so I’m not sure how long you’d have to knead it. Good luck! It will be a good workout!

  20. doris says

    OMG I won’t let my husband buy any store bread ever .. we nomally bake are ezequiel style bread every sunday is are routine. . Omelet with artisan homemade bread .. which we love but for sandwich is not that good . . Today y just try your recipe OMG is so GOOD .. thanks thanks you make my family a happy one .. we love are wheat and carbs ..

    • Polly says

      So glad you liked it!

  21. Shannon says

    Do you take them out of the oven while preheating, or just turn the oven on and let it preheat with them in there?

    • Rachel says

      It’s funny you ask that. Actually I’ve recently begun leaving them in the oven as it preheats. And they turn out perfectly. I just check for doneness by looking at the tops (golden brown) and tapping the loaves (do they sound hollow?). Takes about 30 minutes from the time I start the oven. If it’s already preheated it takes less time…maybe 25 minutes.

  22. Broom says

    Just want to say I love this recipe and have been making it for a month now instead of buying bread. Thank you for sharing!

    • Rachel says

      Wonderful! My pleasure. So glad you’re enjoying it.

  23. Brook says

    My name came up wrong it’s brook not broom lol stupid autocorrect

  24. judy says

    Can you mix this up and freeze it until ready to bake?

    • Rachel says

      I have never tried this, but I know lots of people do freeze dough. I don’t feel qualified to give instruction on it, though. Sorry!

  25. Leann says

    If you want to use all whole wheat flour, try whole wheat pastry flour. I’ve found that it’s lighter, making for a less dense, less “heavy” loaf of bread. I use it for biscuits, artisan bread, honey wheat bread, and I’m going to try it with this recipe next!

  26. arianne says

    My loaves are currently on their second rise… And I realize I forgot the brown sugar. Haha of course. I hope it doesnt mess it up but if so I’ll use it for breadcrumbs and try it again later. It was really easy!!

    • Rachel says

      Oh I hope not either! I made some last week and didn’t have the right kinds of wheat; I tried subbing some homemade oat flour and they got too dense. But, the good news was that it was still really yummy (despite being dense). Maybe yours is salvageable, too??

  27. kerin says

    Hi, I was wondering if you could ask your friend how much of the reg active yeast she used for this recipe? I’m guessing it would be a different amount than the instant yeast?

  28. sue says

    I love this recipe. So glad I found it. I like to have my dough rise in front of the fireplace. I follow to the tee, & it turns out perfect every time.
    My husband found me 3 steel bread pans that are connected at an antique store. They are amazing! Do yourself a favor & invest in steel or iron bread pans. Nonstick or aluminum coated aren’t good for you in my opinion.

    • Rachel says

      I’m so glad you’re enjoying the bread! What a great tip about the pan, too. I’ll keep my eye out for a steel or iron bread pan. I also use glass ones sometimes, which I feel are safe as well.

  29. Kristal says

    Thank you for this recipe. I have been making home made bread for years. I have never made bread so soft and squishy before. I got a little ahead of myself and didn’t follow the recipe exactly as you have outlined, but it is great. As I read though the comments I noticed a lot of people had similar questions. Here is what I did, I hope my experience might help someone else. I used honey and omitted the wheat gluten. I used regular yeast, not the fast rising kind. I don’t measure anything, and I mixed the whole thing by hand. There’s just something about sticking your hands into a bowl of goop and turning it into a pliable dough, I love mixing it by hand. Here’s a little secret I never told anyone before: I always use one bowl and don’t mix the dry ingredients separately but add them as I go. It’s not the way any recipe says to do it, but it works for me. Love this recipe. Thanks.

  30. Leah says

    I’ve been making this recipe for almost two years now. My family was going through bread so quickly I decided to make start making my own. I make this recipe once a week with great success. Here are a few tips I’ve learned and would like to pass along. After adding the flours to the yeast, stir 1-2 minutes to mix it together,then let the dough set for up to 30 minutes to allow the wheat to really absorb the liquid before allowing it to rise. Also, replacing flax with hemp seeds every once in awhile gives it a really nice flavor and the bread is more moist. Lastly, I live in a really humid climate so in the summer I reduce the water by half a cup. I hope these are helpful!

  31. Lunar Leah says

    I made this recipe this past weekend and it turned out so well! My loaves ended up being a little short, though. What size loaf pans did you use? My loaves seemed to rise appropriately in their pans, so maybe my pans are smaller-than-average? Regardless, this recipe is a definite keeper, and I will be experimenting with Vital Wheat Gluten in more bread recipes.

    • Rachel says

      I’ve used slightly different sized pans over the years. The loaves sometimes come out taller and thinner and sometimes flatter and wider, but I always end up with bread that is gone in days! 🙂 So glad you enjoyed it!

  32. Becky Parrish says

    How many slices do you typically get out of a loaf? I love this recipe!

    • Rachel says

      Since we typically just slice away at random on the loaves, I don’t really know. Sorry!

  33. Teri says

    This is a great recipe! Some whole wheat cooks are purists and will only use whole wheat kernels, freshly ground. With this recipe you can be a moderate (lol) and use half freshly ground and half King Arthur (white or wheat) all-purpose or bread flour. That way the bread comes out soft and very tasty but not like the bricks I have been known to make. The first time I made it my husband said, “Keep this recipe! It’s really good.” Thanks again.

    • Rachel says

      You’re so right, Teri. We call ourselves “real food realists”, since homemade food is always healthier (even if it isn’t 100% “whole”). I will say that I’ve made these with 100% white whole wheat and they really aren’t bad, though. I’m SO happy your family likes this bread. It doesn’t stick around our house long when I make it.

  34. Becky says

    Have you tried freezing the loaves before they’re baked? My husband likes homemade bread but usually only whenever it’s fresh from the oven so I thought of it froze well I could just thaw out and bake whenever we need a new loaf. If not I’d have to cut the recipe in thirds.

    • Rachel says

      I have not tried this, sorry. I like the idea, though, and I’m sure you could google how to do it. Please let me know if you try it and how it goes!

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Rate this recipe:  

Posted in Eat Well, Recipe, Baked Goods, Eat Well, Eat Well, Recipe, Freezer Meals, Freezer Misc, Eat Well, Recipe, Baked Goods, Miscellaneous, Eat Well, Popular Recipes, Eat Well, Recipe, Uncategorized